Biove - Recipes #3 & #4

Adapted from "Pane e Roba Dolce" by the Sorelli Simili (Simili Sisters)

biove.jpg (8954 bytes)Biove is a bread of Piedmont. It is a fairly large, relatively high loaf, is  round, and is scored in the center. It is usually produced using type 00 flour, and can weigh 1/4 kilogram or more. The city of Pavia is especially well known for its Biove.

Biove is a bread which is characteristic of Lombardy and Piedmont.

The recipes below describe  Direct and Indirect Methods. Try them both, and let us know which one you prefer Two additional recipes for Biove have also been added to The Artisan (Click here for Recipes #1 & #2)


Direct Method

Ingredients

3 Tsp. Yeast
1/2 Cup Water- warm (120 ml)
3 3/4 Cups Flour: all-purpose unbleached (500 g)
1 Tsp. (full) Salt (5g)
1/4 Cup + 3 Tbl. Water (105 ml)
1 Tsp. (scant) Malt (5g)
1 Tbl. + 1 Tsp. Lard (20 g) - [See Note Below]
Note: Extra-virgin olive oil may substitute for lard

Procedure

Dissolve the yeast in 1/2 cup water and allow it to stand for approximately 5-10 minutes. Combine the flour (3 3/4 cups), and salt (1 full teaspoon).  Place the flour mixture on the work surface (or in a large bowl) and make a well in the center.  Add the dissolved yeast, additional water (1/4 cup plus 3 tablespoons), malt (1 scant teaspoon), and lard (1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon), mixing well between additions. Continue to mix until the dough begins to hold together. Knead the dough to a soft, but not sticky, consistency (8-10 minutes).

Place the dough in a lightly floured bowl.  Cover the bowl and allow the dough to rest for 20 minutes.

Turn the risen dough onto a flour dusted work surface. Divide the dough into two equal portions. Working with one portion at a time, cup your hands beneath the dough and gently fold sections of it toward the center as you turn it, to form a loose round ball. Gently press the ball into a disk. Lift up approximately one inch of the far edge of the disk and fold it toward you. Lift the folded edge and roll it up toward you until the dough takes on a cylindrical shape. When you reach the edge of the disk, press the edge of the cylinder to the bottom edge of the disk with the heel of your hand, thereby forming a seam. Turn each cylinder 90 degrees (1/4 quarter turn). Using a rolling pin, flatten each cylinder into a long and thin rectangle. Beginning at the edge farthest from you, once again, roll the dough toward you into a cylinder. In this instance use your thumbs as a guide on each side to prevent points from forming. Each portion of dough now resembles a snail. Dust a piece of canvas (untreated, 100% cotton) with flour. Place a bag of flour under one edge of the canvas. Place the rolled edge of one portion of dough (seam-side down) against the canvassed flour bag. It looks as if the "snail" were facing you. Lift the canvas at the other edge of the dough to create a fold. Place the second portion of dough against the first, rolled edge to rolled edge. Put a second bag of flour under the canvas at the other edge of the dough to support it. Cover the dough with a cotton towel. Allow it to rise for 30-40 minutes.

As the dough is rising, place a baking stone in the oven and set the temperature to 450 F. Allow the oven to heat for 30 minutes.

In Italy, a special tool is used to cut Biove. This tool is shaped like a dough scraper and made of wood. A plastic or steel dough scraper or a wooden dowel will have the same effect. Transfer the dough from the canvass to the flour dusted work surface. Using a scraper or dowel, apply pressure in a downward motion at the center of each piece of dough, lengthwise. (One rolled edge of the dough should be facing the top of the work surface and the other facing the bottom. The scraper or dowel should be positioned, vertically, in the center of the dough.) Transfer each portion of dough to a sheet of parchment paper, open side up, and slash through the opening with a blade. Slide a baker’s peel beneath the parchment paper. Lower the oven temperature to 400 F. Slide the parchment paper from the peel onto the baking stone. Allow the dough to bake until it is a golden color (25 - 30 minutes).

Remove the loaves from the oven and allow them to cool on a rack.


Indirect Method - Poolish

(Adapted from Il Pane, Un'Arte, Una Technologia by Piergiorgio Giorilla and Simona Lauri)

Ingredients

Starter

1/2 Tsp. Yeast - Active dry or 1/5th of a small cake yeast (3 g)
1/4 Cup Water - Warm (60 ml)
1/4 Cup + 2 Tbl. Water (90 ml)
1 Cup + 2 Tbl. Flour: all-purpose unbleached (150 g)

Dough

1 Tsp. Yeast - active dry yeast or 1/2 small cake yeast (9 g)
1/4 Cup Water - warm (60 ml)
3 Tbl. Water (45 ml)
1 Tbl. + 1 Tsp. Lard - [See Note Below]
300 g Starter From Above
2 1/4 Cups Flour: all-purpose unbleached (300g)
1/4 Tsp. Malt (2 g)
2 Tsp. Salt (10 g)
Note:   Extra-virgin olive oil may substitute for lard

Procedure

Starter

Dissolve the yeast in 1/4 cup water and allow it to stand for approximately 5 -10 minutes. Add 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour and mix until the flour is absorbed. Knead the dough to a firm consistency. Cover the starter and allow it to remain at room temperature overnight.

Dough

Dissolve the yeast in 1/4 cup water and allow it to stand for approximately 5 -10 minutes. Combine the flour (2 1/4 cups), and malt (1/4 teaspoon)Place the flour mixture on the work surface (or in a large bowl) and make a well in the center. Combine the additional water (3 tablespoons) with  the lard (1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon).  Gradually add the dissolved yeast,  additional water mixture, and starter to the flour, Mix until the dough begins to hold together.  Knead the dough to a soft, but not sticky, consistency (8 -10 minutes). Add the salt (2 teaspoons) toward the end of the kneading.

Place the dough in a lightly floured bowl. Allow the dough to rest for 15 minutes.

Turn the risen dough onto a flour dusted work surface. Divide the dough into two equal portions. Working with one portion at a time, cup your hands beneath the dough and gently fold sections of it toward the center, as you turn it, to form a loose round ball. Gently press the ball into a disk. Lift up approximately one inch of the far edge of the disk and fold it toward you. Lift the folded edge and roll it up toward you until the dough takes on a cylindrical shape. When you reach the edge of the disk, press the edge of the cylinder to the bottom edge of the disk with the heel of your hand, thereby forming a seam. Turn each cylinder 90 degrees (1/4 quarter turn). Using a rolling pin, flatten each cylinder into a long and thin rectangle. Beginning at the edge farthest from you, once again, roll the dough toward you into a cylinder. In this instance use your thumbs as a guide on each side to prevent points from forming. Each portion of dough now resembles a snail. Dust a piece of canvas (untreated, 100% cotton) with flour. Place a bag of flour under one edge of the canvas. Place the rolled edge of one portion of dough (seam-side down) against the canvassed flour bag. It looks as if the "snail" were facing you. Lift the canvas at the other edge of the dough to create a fold. Place the second portion of dough against the first, rolled edge to rolled edge. Put a second bag of flour under the canvas at the other edge of the dough to support it. Cover the dough with a cotton towel. Allow it to rise for 50-60 minutes at 80 degrees.

As the dough is rising, place a baking stone in the oven and set the temperature to 450 F. Allow the oven to heat for 30 minutes.

In Italy, a special tool is used to cut Biove. This tool is shaped like a dough scraper and made of wood. A plastic or steel dough scraper or a wooden dowel will have the same effect. Transfer the dough from the canvass to the flour dusted work surface. Using a scraper or dowel, apply pressure in a downward motion at the center of each piece of dough, lengthwise. (One rolled edge of the dough should be facing the top of the work surface and the other facing the bottom. The scraper or dowel should be positioned, vertically, in the center of the dough.) Slightly compress the ends of each portion. Transfer each portion of dough to a sheet of parchment paper, open side up, and slash through the opening with a blade. Slide a baker’s peel beneath the parchment paper. Lower the oven temperature to 400 F. Slide the parchment paper from the peel onto the baking stone. Allow the dough to bake until it is a golden color (25 - 30 minutes).

Remove the loaves from the oven and allow them to cool on a rack.

NOTE: Commercial Italian bakers use specialized equipment to roll individual disks of dough into cylindrical shapes (referred to as filone), which are subsequently rolled into the shape of a Biove. The instructions provided above are presented as a manual alternative for the serious home baker.


FrmBottomBar.gif (1768 bytes)


Last updated on:04/19/04 08:22:12 PM