Biove - Recipes #1 & #2


biove.jpg (31452 bytes)Biove is a bread of Piedmont. It is a fairly large, relatively high loaf, is  round, and is scored in the center. It is usually produced using type 00 flour, and can weigh 1/4 kilogram or more. The city of Pavia is especially well known for its Biove.

Biove is a bread which is characteristic of Lombardy and Piedmont.

The recipes below describe Direct and Indirect Methods. Try them both. Let us know which one you prefer Two additional recipes for Biove have also been added to The Artisan (Click here for Recipes #3 & #4)


Direct Method

Ingredients

2 1/2 Tsp. Active dry yeast (or 1 sm. Cake yeast - 18g)
1/2 Cup Water - warm (120 ml)
3 3/4 Cups Flour - unbleached all purpose (500 g)
3/4 Cup Water (180 ml) - [See Note 1 Below]
4 Tsp. Lard (20 g) - [See Note 2 Below]
2 Tsp. Salt (10 g)

Note 1: Increase this amount to achieve the desired consistency

Note 2: Extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) may substitute for lard

Procedure

Dissolve the yeast in 1/2 cup water and allow it to stand for approximately 5-10 minutes. Place the flour (3 3/4 cup) on the work surface (or in a large bowl) and make a well in the center. Gradually add the dissolved yeast and the additional water (3/4 cup) to the flour, mixing well between additions. Continue to mix until the dough begins to hold together. Knead the dough to a soft consistency (approximately 5 minutes).

Add the lard (4 teaspoons), and salt (2 teaspoons), and continue to knead until the dough is smooth and elastic (approximately 10 minutes).

Place the dough in a lightly floured bowl.  Cover the bowl and allow the dough to rise until it is double its original size (approximately 45-50 minutes).

Gently turn the risen dough onto a flour dusted work surface. Cut the dough in half with a dough scraper and allow each portion to rest for 10 minutes. Dust a piece of canvas (untreated, 100% cotton), or a proofing board (lumber core plywood) with flour. Gently flatten each portion of dough into a rectangle. Using your thumbs as a guide, begin from one short side, and roll the dough toward you into a fat cylinder. Place the dough on the canvas or board, seam side down. Cover with a cotton towel. Allow the dough to rise until it is nearly double (approximately 1 – 1 1/2 hours).

As the dough is rising, place a baking stone in the oven and set the temperature to 500 F. Allow the oven to heat for 30 minutes.

Ten minutes before baking turn the dough over. In Italy, a special tool is used to cut Biove. This tool is shaped like a dough scraper and made of wood. A plastic or steel dough scraper or a wooden dowel will have the same effect. Press down and push on each piece of dough lengthwise, opening it and almost cutting through to the bottom. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured sheet of parchment paper. Slide a baker’s peel beneath the parchment paper. Lower the oven temperature to 425 F. Slide the parchment paper from the peel onto the baking stone. Allow the dough to bake until it is a golden color (approximately 30 minutes). After 15 - 20 minutes, check the oven to be certain that the dough is not browning too quickly. If this is the case, cover the loaves with foil.

Remove the loaves from the oven and allow them to cool on a rack.


INDIRECT METHOD

Ingredients

Starter

1/2 Tsp. Active dry yeast (or 1/5 sm. Cake yeast - 3g)
1/2 Cup Water - warm (120 ml)
3 Tbl. Water (45 ml)
2 1/2 Cups Flour - unbleached all purpose (335 g)

Dough

1 Tsp. Active dry yeast (or 2/5 sm. Cake yeast - 7g)
1/4 Cup Water - warm (60 ml)
1 1/4 Cups Flour - unbleached all purpose (165 g)
1/4 Tsp. Malt (2 g)
All   Starter from above (500 g)
1/4 Cup Water (60 ml)
4 Tsp. Lard (20 g) - See Note Below
2 Tsp. Salt (10 g)

Note: Extra-virgin olive oil may substitute for lard

Procedure

Starter

Dissolve the yeast in 1/2 cup plus 3 tablespoons water and allow it to stand for approximately 5 -10 minutes. Add the unbleached all-purpose flour (2 1/2 cups) and mix until the flour is absorbed. Knead the dough to a firm consistency. Cover the starter and allow it to remain at room temperature for 10 hours or overnight.

Dough

Dissolve the yeast in 1/4 cup water and allow it to stand for approximately 5-10 minutes. Combine the flour (1 1/4 cup) and the malt (1/4 teaspoon).  Place the flour mixture on the work surface (or in a large bowl) and make a well in the center. Add the dissolved yeast, additional water (1/4 cup), and starter to the flour mixture.  Mix until the dough begins to hold together. Knead the dough to a soft consistency (approximately 5 minutes). 

Add the lard (4 teaspoons) and salt (2 teaspoons), and continue to knead until the dough is smooth and elastic (approximately 10 minutes).  

Place the dough in a lightly floured bowl. Covert the bowl and allow the dough to rise until it is double its original size (approximately 1 hour).

Gently turn the risen dough onto a flour dusted work surface. Cut the dough in half with a dough scraper and allow each portion to rest for 10 minutes. Dust a piece of canvas (untreated, 100% cotton), or a proofing board (lumber core plywood) with flour. Gently flatten each portion of dough into a rectangle. Using your thumbs as a guide, begin from one short side, and roll the dough toward you into a fat cylinder. Place the dough on the canvas or board, seam side down. Cover with a cotton towel.

Allow the dough to rise until it is nearly double (approximately 1 – 1 1/2 hours).

As the dough is rising, place a baking stone in the oven and set the temperature to 500 F. Allow the oven to heat for 30 minutes.

Ten minutes before baking turn the dough over. In Italy, a special tool is used to cut Biove. This tool is shaped like a dough scraper and made of wood. A plastic or steel dough scraper or a wooden dowel will have the same effect. Press down and push on each piece of dough lengthwise, opening it and almost cutting through to the bottom. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured sheet of parchment paper. Slide a baker’s peel beneath the parchment paper. Lower the oven temperature to 425 F. Slide the parchment paper from the peel onto the baking stone. Allow the dough to bake until it is a golden color (approximately 30 minutes). After 15 - 20 minutes, check the oven to be certain that the dough is not browning too quickly. If this is the case, cover the loaves with foil.

Remove the loaves from the oven and allow them to cool on a rack.

NOTE: Italian bakers use a cilindratrice (a piece of equipment that rolls or presses the dough) in the process of making Biove. In the USA a cilindratrice is known as a sheeter. In the direct method, the dough is put through the sheeter 7-8 times prior to dividing and shaping it. In the indirect method, the dough is put through the sheeter 10-12 times prior to dividing and shaping it. A serious home baker who craves authenticity may experiment with a pasta press in place of a cilindratrice or sheeter.


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Last updated on: 04/19/04 08:21:54 PM